Estonia: One Of The World’s Strongest Populations Of Wolves And Lynxes

Several good reasons to visit Estonian nature:

  • Estonia’s population of wolves and lynxes is one of the strongest in the world.
  • Estonia has the world’s leading role in organising the protection and restoring of the European mink
  • We have 3-5 times more bears per km2 than our neighbouring countries.
  • About 10 per cent of the whole Common Crane population in Europe visit Estonia every autumn.
  • Black Stork, Hazel Grouse, Capercaillie and Nutcracker. 40,000 pairs Hazel Grouse nesting here
  • Brown bears, wolves, lynxes, European beavers and flying squirrel
  • Flocks of Steller´s Eider
  • 8 species of woodpeckers
  • Compared with Poland, four times as many Ural Owls and six times as many White-backed Woodpeckers breed in Estonia.
  • More White-backed Woodpeckers may nest in one national park in Estonia than in the whole of Sweden!
  • Atmospheric pine forests – habitats to Ural and Pygmy Owls
  • 36 species of Orchids have been found in Estonia
  • Estonian flora is comprised of about 550 species of mosses, 1,440 species of vascular plants, 3,000 species of algae and 800 species of lichens
  • Wonderful network of unspoilt wetland habitats, a lot of open space and silence
  • Massive assemblies of migrating waterbirds from the Arctic – in May 1997 in a single day one million passing arctic waterfowls were counted at Cape Põõsaspea.
  • “International Crane Assembly“
  • In Estonia you can find about 900 large butterfly species, over 1000 small butterfly species and more than 50 kinds of dragonflies.

Estonia: More Than 900 Big Butterly Species, 1000 Small Butterly Species Plus 50 Dragonfly Species

Butterflies & Dragonflies

Despite its small surface area Estonia has a huge amount of different butterfly, moth and also dragonfly species. Thanks to our untouched nature we have places that have been completely intact for more than 50 years. These areas are the favourite places for butterflies. Every year also new species are discovered. A large number of flowery meadows, natural forests and massive bog areas are the habitats for dragonflies and butterflies. Thanks to having such favourable habitats for butterflies and dragonflies we have different species that are very rare in the rest of Europe e.g. Clouded Apollo, Moor-land Clouded Yellow, Large Copper, Siberian Winter Damsel and Lilypad Whiteface in addition also dragonflies like Bog Hawker and Arctic Bluet, dragonflies such as Ruby, Yellow-spotted and Dark Whitefaces  as well as the coastal Baltic Hawker etc.

In Estonia you can find about 900 large butterfly species, over 1000 small butterfly species and more than 50 kinds of dragonflies.

 

Our Dear Friend Ajatao Is Dead According To Many Blog Entries—But I See That He Still Likes Posts Today ????

Of course I would be pleased if he was alive, but this is confusing!

Saturday 23th August: Black Ribbon Day In The Whole World For Victims Of Nazism And Communism And Honour The Victims Of Holocaust And People Who Died In Soviet Camps( I’m A Descendant Of Parents Who Suffered Both Nazism And Communism)

European Day Of Remembrance For Victims Of Stalinism And Nazism

The European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism, known as the Black Ribbon Day in some countries,[1] which is observed on 23 August, is the international remembrance day for victims of communism/stalinism and fascism/nazism.

It was designated by the European Parliament in 2008/2009 as “a Europe-wide Day of Remembrance for the victims of all totalitarian and authoritarian regimes, to be commemorated with dignity and impartiality,”[2][3] and has been observed annually by the bodies of the European Union since 2009.[4][5][6] The European Parliament’s 2009 resolution on European conscience and totalitarianism, co-sponsored by the European People’s Party, the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe, The Greens–European Free Alliance, and the Union for Europe of the Nations, called for its implementation in all of Europe. The establishment of 23 August as an international remembrance day for victims of totalitarianism was also supported by the 2009 Vilnius Declaration of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly.[7]

23 August was chosen to coincide with the date of the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in which the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany agreed to divide eastern Europe between themselves, an event described by the European Parliament’s president Jerzy Buzek in 2010 as “the collusion of the two worst forms of totalitarianism in the history of humanity.”[4] The remembrance day originated in protests held in western cities against Soviet crimes and occupation in the 1980s, initiated by Canadian refugees from countries occupied by the Soviet Union, and that culminated in The Baltic Way, a major demonstration during the Revolutions of 1989 that contributed to the liberation of the Baltic states.

The purpose of the Day of Remembrance is to preserve the memory of the victims of mass deportations and exterminations, while promoting democratic values with the aim of reinforcing peace and stability in Europe.[8]

23 August is also officially recognised by Canada and the United States where it is known as Black Ribbon Day.[9]

 

 

Historical background[edit]

Both the date of 23 August as a remembrance day and the name “Black Ribbon Day” originated in demonstrations held in western countries in the 1980s, organised mostly by refugees from countries occupied by the Soviet Union, to bring attention to Soviet crimes and human rights violations, and to protest against the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact in which Hitler gave Joseph Stalin free hands to invade several Eastern European nations as well as subsequent deals such as the Yalta Conference in which Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt gave Joseph Stalin free hands in Eastern Europe, including to annex states occupied by the Soviet Union and impose a totalitarian dictatorship on them that lasted for decades. On 23 August 1986, Black Ribbon Day demonstrations were held in 21 western cities including New York City, Ottawa, London, Stockholm, Seattle, Los Angeles, Perth, Australia and Washington DC. The demonstrations were initiated by Canada’s Central and Eastern European communities.[10]

In 1987, Black Ribbon Day protests spread to the Baltic countries, culminating in the Baltic Way in 1989, a historic event during the revolutions of 1989, in which two million people joined their hands to form a human chain, to protest against the continued Soviet occupation.[11][1]

European Day Of Remembrance For Victims Of Stalinism And Nazism

The European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism, known as the Black Ribbon Day in some countries,[1] which is observed on 23 August, is the international remembrance day for victims of communism/stalinism and fascism/nazism.

It was designated by the European Parliament in 2008/2009 as “a Europe-wide Day of Remembrance for the victims of all totalitarian and authoritarian regimes, to be commemorated with dignity and impartiality,”[2][3] and has been observed annually by the bodies of the European Union since 2009.[4][5][6] The European Parliament’s 2009 resolution on European conscience and totalitarianism, co-sponsored by the European People’s Party, the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe, The Greens–European Free Alliance, and the Union for Europe of the Nations, called for its implementation in all of Europe. The establishment of 23 August as an international remembrance day for victims of totalitarianism was also supported by the 2009 Vilnius Declaration of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly.[7]

23 August was chosen to coincide with the date of the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in which the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany agreed to divide eastern Europe between themselves, an event described by the European Parliament’s president Jerzy Buzek in 2010 as “the collusion of the two worst forms of totalitarianism in the history of humanity.”[4] The remembrance day originated in protests held in western cities against Soviet crimes and occupation in the 1980s, initiated by Canadian refugees from countries occupied by the Soviet Union, and that culminated in The Baltic Way, a major demonstration during the Revolutions of 1989 that contributed to the liberation of the Baltic states.

The purpose of the Day of Remembrance is to preserve the memory of the victims of mass deportations and exterminations, while promoting democratic values with the aim of reinforcing peace and stability in Europe.[8]

23 August is also officially recognised by Canada and the United States where it is known as Black Ribbon Day.[9]

 

 

Historical background[edit]

Both the date of 23 August as a remembrance day and the name “Black Ribbon Day” originated in demonstrations held in western countries in the 1980s, organised mostly by refugees from countries occupied by the Soviet Union, to bring attention to Soviet crimes and human rights violations, and to protest against the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact in which Hitler gave Joseph Stalin free hands to invade several Eastern European nations as well as subsequent deals such as the Yalta Conference in which Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt gave Joseph Stalin free hands in Eastern Europe, including to annex states occupied by the Soviet Union and impose a totalitarian dictatorship on them that lasted for decades. On 23 August 1986, Black Ribbon Day demonstrations were held in 21 western cities including New York City, Ottawa, London, Stockholm, Seattle, Los Angeles, Perth, Australia and Washington DC. The demonstrations were initiated by Canada’s Central and Eastern European communities.[10]

In 1987, Black Ribbon Day protests spread to the Baltic countries, culminating in the Baltic Way in 1989, a historic event during the revolutions of 1989, in which two million people joined their hands to form a human chain, to protest against the continued Soviet occupation.[11][1]

The ABC’s of animal speech: Not so random after all

Originally posted on World of Birds:

theabcsofani

songbird

The calls of many animals, from whales to wolves, might contain more language-like structure than previously thought, according to study that raises new questions about the evolutionary origins of human language.

The study, published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, analyzed the vocal sequences of seven different species of birds and mammals and found that the vocal sequences produced by the animals appear to be generated by complex statistical processes, more akin to human language.

Many species of animals produce complex vocalizations – consider the mockingbird, for example, which can mimic over 100 distinct song types of different species, or the rock hyrax, whose long string of wails, chucks and snorts signify male territory. But while the vocalizations suggest language-like characteristics, scientists have found it difficult to define and identify the complexity.

View original 318 more words

Corny Tomato and Jalapeño Pepper Tart (Vegan And Gluten Free)

Originally posted on watch hatch fly:

IMG_4235

This may sound corny, but I do love a tart! This is a recipe that deals nicely with the proliferation of tomatoes, herbs and peppers you have in your summer garden. If you use just a couple of seeded jalapeño peppers, the result will NOT be spicy. If you’d like to turn up the heat, add more peppers and include some seeds!

Corny Tomato and Jalapeño Pepper Tart (Vegan and Gluten Free)

Ingredients:

Crust:

One cup almond meal
One cup corn flour (not corn meal)
One tablespoon fresh oregano
One tablespoon fresh basil
One teaspoon dried cumin
One-half teaspoon salt
One-half teaspoon pepper
One-half cup water
One tablespoon coconut oil, softened at room temperature
Two teaspoons agave

First Filling Layer:

One large white onion, quartered and sliced
Two to four fresh jalapeño peppers (seeded and sliced)
One tablespoon olive oil

Second Filling Layer:

Two cups cherry tomatoes
One tablespoon olive…

View original 213 more words

Sweden: Amid All Conservation Doom And Gloom: A Success Story About The White-tailed Eagle

From a population of only 20 pairs of Eagles in the 70’s, due to DDT intoxication, that weakened the egg Shells, Sweden now has over 600 pairs of Sea Eagles.

They were most common North of Stockholm, where I lived. I encountered them almost every day. People like them because they also eat Cormorants, not a popular bird in Sweden.Sea Eagle 1 April

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